Emory and the Confederacy: Part Four

Emory dedicated Longstreet-Means Hall in 1955, during a time of phenomenal growth of the campus and the student body, and one year after women had been admitted as residential students of Emory College. The previous year also had brought the US Supreme Court ruling in Brown v Board of Education, which prompted “massive resistance” against … Continue reading Emory and the Confederacy: Part Four

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Emory and the Confederacy, Part Three: The case of A. B. Longstreet

Generations of students have lived in Longstreet–Means Hall without knowing much, if anything, about the Emory presidents for whom the building was named—Augustus Baldwin Longstreet and Alexander Means.     Longstreet had practiced law and achieved fame and fortune as an author before entering the Methodist ministry and then becoming president of Emory (1840–48). Means … Continue reading Emory and the Confederacy, Part Three: The case of A. B. Longstreet

Emory and the Confederacy, Part Two: The case of Justice Lamar

Many Emory law students today might be surprised to learn that their school was not always simply Emory Law School. When the trustees established the school in 1916, they named it the Lamar School of Law, after Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar, Emory College Class of 1845. The minutes of the trustees don’t reveal their reasons … Continue reading Emory and the Confederacy, Part Two: The case of Justice Lamar

Mark Auslander’s further exploration of slavery in Emory’s earlier environs

As Emory prepares to host a major conference on slavery and the dispossession of Native American lands, I turn to Mark Auslander for this latest post on Emory history. Mark is a former faculty member at Oxford College and is now a research scholar in anthropology at Brandeis University and visiting associate professor at Boston … Continue reading Mark Auslander’s further exploration of slavery in Emory’s earlier environs

L.Q.C. Lamar and Henry Adams

It’s exhilarating to stumble upon unexpected relationships. Reading The Education of Henry Adams on New Year’s Day, I found a surprising Emory connection in this memoir by a consummate Boston Yankee. Great-grandson of John, grandson of John Quincy, and son of Lincoln’s minister to Great Britain, Henry Adams rose to his own heights of achievement … Continue reading L.Q.C. Lamar and Henry Adams